Birdhouses adorn Peccole Ranch walking path

A woman walks with her dog past birdhouses along a walking trail in Peccole Ranch in Summerlin. ...

(Bizuayehu Tesfaye/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
(Bizuayehu Tesfaye/Las Vegas Review-Journal)

A winding path along the Peccole Ranch Trail is more than just a verdant swath for walking pets, exercising, or enjoying the considerable shade beneath the leafy canopies. Careful observers are likely to spot an array of whimsical objects in the branches above — a collection of hanging homes for hundreds of finches, sparrows, hummingbirds and other feathered visitors.
(Bizuayehu Tesfaye/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
(Bizuayehu Tesfaye/Las Vegas Review-Journal)

Affectionately known as “Birdhouse Alley” among regulars, the collection features a range of architecture. There are Victorians with peaked roofs and bay windows, Colonials, rustic cabins, cylinders, nautical motifs and even an Airstream.

What started as just a few birdhouses in 2015 has grown to more than two dozen today, said Maryann Goodsell, president of the Peccole Ranch community association board. She and other members of the neighborhood group have sought eclectic, contemporary, creative versions to surprise and delight those who visit the parkway north of W. Sahara Avenue between Hualapai Way and South Fort Apache Road.
(Bizuayehu Tesfaye/Las Vegas Review-Journal)
(Bizuayehu Tesfaye/Las Vegas Review-Journal)

“We tried to cluster them around places where people would naturally spend time,” Goodsell said, as the trail has gained popularity as a cool respite from the summer heat.

Though the board selected the majority of birdhouses, locals have contributed some as well, she said. One former resident donated a birdhouse her dad made that features the family’s old Nevada license plate serving as the roof.

While the collection is still a bit of a secret for now, the association plans to continue adding birdhouses to keep charming sightseers of all ages for years to come.

2050 S. Hualapai Way